Dining in Boston: Part Three

Also known as the other stuff we ate. I didn’t remember to take pictures of everything, but I got most things.

Day One, if we recall, started out at the hotel for breakfast (and a stop at Dunkin’ Donuts), with Union Oyster House for lunch. Dinner that night was at my favorite Thai place from college, Brown Sugar Cafe.

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Brandon had the lemon chicken.

brown_sugar_thai_fried_rice
I still dream about this fried rice. I cannot find ANYTHING like it here in Denver. I’ve tried recreating it in the kitchen with no success. I adore this dish so much.

Afterward, we went to Angora Cafe for the best frozen yogurt around. Most places have x amount of machines with flavored yogurt. Not Angora. Angora has a plain yogurt that you can mix in whatever flavor you want. I want coffee? They mix it together with ACTUAL coffee. It’s amazing.

angora_frozen_yogurt
Brandon’s Oreo on the left, my coffee on the right. Perfect way to end the first day.

Day Two we mostly talked about in the previous two posts of the series, but we had a bite at Anna’s Taqueria with friends (I ate a chicken quesadilla) and we also split a delicious Oreo cannoli at Mike’s Pastry.

mikes_cannolis3
Oreo is the way to go.

Day Three we tried Sunset Cantina on the BU campus for lunch, but it was a strong disappointment. I remember it being loads better. Maybe our mistake was going there as opposed to Sunset Grill and Tap (same company, about a mile up the road), but it was a lunch of disappointment after a race of disappointment and preceded my alumnae game of disappointment.

Day Four started off with the strong breakfast game, got a bit weaker as we quickly snarfed a mushroom cheesesteak from D’Angelos before we went to Blue Man Group, but the night picked up with delicious dinner from T. Anthony’s.

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Brandon had a meatball sub.

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I had the chicken parm, which is just as amazing as ever and is still (in the humblest of opinions) the best chicken parm on the planet.

Day Six, Marathon day, was a lot of grazing (really not a lot of eating), but we did hit up Spike’s for their amazing poodle fries with cheese. I snarfed most of them before I realized, crap, photo:
spikes_poodle_fries
Oops.

Day Seven saw us split another Oreo cannoli from Mike’s, and we also tried their cheesecake.

mikes_cheesecake
It … wasn’t bad, but I believe I’ve had better. Maybe it was because we’d been carrying it around half the day before we finally dug into it.

As this was also the disappointing lobster roll and dill chowder day, we decided to end Boston on the highest of notes with another stop at Brown Sugar for Thai fried rice, Angora for more froyo, and T. Anthony’s for a slice of the reason I don’t really eat pizza in Denver.

tanthonys_pizza

Boston, you have spoiled me, food-wise, for so many things. Never, ever change.

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Dining in Boston: Part Two

As part one was breakfast, I’m dedicating part two to seafood, because Boston has a lot of it and it is delicious.

However, since this *is* me, eating seafood in Boston mostly means clam chowder and lobster rolls. So y’know …

The seafood started on Day One with a stop at Union Oyster House for chowder. Brandon also tried oysters (missed a picture) and I tried their lobster roll.

union_oyster_house_lobster_roll
The lobster itself was really good, the bun was accurate; the only thing “off” was the use of lettuce and tomato. Which I generally like on a sandwich, but does not belong on a lobster roll.

On Day Two, we split a lobster roll at James Hook and Co., one of the places I read had a good one. The list was accurate here, as this may have been my favorite lobster roll of the trip.

james_hook_co_lobster_roll

We headed off to the Barking Crab next as Brandon said they had good chowder, but I was disappointed (and, so was he). Consistency was all off; it almost felt like a cheese soup as opposed to a chowder.

barking_crab_clam_chowder

Day Three led to a trip to the ever-awesome Legal Sea Foods for dinner. While we enjoyed gluten in our food (chowder, their delicious rolls), our friend Nic, who we went with, has celiac disease. Legal’s went above and beyond making sure everything was gluten-free and wonderful for her. From gluten-free chowder to gluten-free rolls and even a specific extra staff member to help her out, they were outstanding. So, if you have celiac disease and are in Boston (or any of the other cities Legal’s has an outpost in), head to Legal Sea Foods – they will treat you well.

Continuing on, Brandon and I both had a cup of chowder, because of course.

legal_sea_foods_chowder

Both Brandon and Nic had the Grilled Assortment, which was a chef’s choice of three fish (salmon, swordfish, and tuna), shrimp, and scallops. It was a ton of food.

legal_sea_foods_managers_choice

I chose something a bit different, and got the Nutty Faroe Island Salmon, which was almond-encrusted salmon sauteed in a lemon-butter caper sauce served with spinach and (which sold me) mushroom ravioli. The ravioli? On point. The salmon? Pretty good, but I don’t know if I’d order it again. Plus, capers? Ew.

legal_sea_foods_almond_salmon

Our next seafood adventure wasn’t until Day Six (we needed a break). I had heard from multiple sources (online, one of the guys at Union Oyster House) that the best lobster roll in town was the hot roll (Connecticut style) at Neptune Oyster. I also read that the place filled up super quickly so we got there before they opened, still waited in line, and barely got seated. The place is a teeny tiny hole in the wall in the North End. We, and most everyone in there, ordered the hot lobster roll.

neptune_oyster_lobster_roll

To be perfectly honest … I’ve had better. The bun, as you can see in the picture, is incorrect, and it made a difference. The roll also fell apart more than it should have (too much butter?) and the taste? Off. Both Brandon and I wondered if everyone loved it solely for the fact that a hot lobster roll is simply hard to find in Boston. The fries, however, were perfect seafood fries, though I wonder if I think that solely because they’re very similar to what’s served at a seafood restaurant here in town …

After Neptune, we headed to Boston Sail Loft which supposedly has some of the best chowder in town. It might … if you like dill in your clam chowder. Which we definitely don’t.

boston_sail_loft_chowder
Aaaaalll the dill.

We couldn’t even finish our chowder. We could tell the waitress was concerned as she kept asking if everything was okay. I over-tipped her with a note on the receipt saying that nothing was her fault; we just don’t like dill!

There were a few more lobster rolls I would have liked to have tried (including Legal’s, but I would have had to hit them up for lunch for that), but I think I hit my limit on the trip. Next time …

Dining in Boston: Part One

Back in April, we went to Boston for the Marathon weekend. That, and to eat. A lot. Because I adore Boston food and miss it terribly.

Therefore, for your reading (and drooling) pleasure, I present to you a short series: Dining in Boston. This is part one – breakfast.

Day One we simply ate the hotel breakfast (Holiday Inn Express) and then shared some Dunkin’ munchkins. Simple.

Day Two we went to one of my favorite college hangouts, T. Anthony’s. Eggs, bacon, toast, home fries. Simple, tasty.

More importantly, since we were racing the BAA 5K the next day, we needed breakfast for dinner. Brandon found a gem on Beacon Street near the St. Mary’s T stop called the Busy Bee Diner (no site; just trust me on this one). It was fantastic.

busy_bee_frappe
An authentic Frappe.

busy_bee_breakfast
All of the food.

Tasty, delicious, totally Greek. I also have to add that this place made the most perfect over-medium egg I have ever had. Seriously. Over-medium are so hard to get right and the Busy Bee nailed it.

Day Three we headed back to the Busy Bee right as they opened to grab some eggs before the race. Solid move once again.

Day Four we split our morning into two breakfasts. Clearly the way to go. Back in college, I saw this doughnut place called Twin Donuts, but never went. If I had realized how close it actually was, I may have actually gone.

twin_donuts_doughnuts
We split a chocolate-frosted (pretty solid) and a honey dip, their version of a glazed, which was outstanding enough to almost want to get another one.

twin_donuts_sandwich
We also split a ham, egg, and cheese breakfast sandwich for some protein. Neither of us was expecting much out of it, but it was really actually pretty good.

From there, we ran down to Starbucks for some coffee (blasphemy in that town, I know) and then busted ass to the hotel to change and head over to Bagelsaurus.

Bagelsaurus was going to be another new Boston experience for both of us. I had read some list about 50 foods in Boston you HAVE to eat blahblahblah and Bagelsaurus caught my eye … and not only because of the name. It’s located in Porter Square, a couple block walk away from the Porter stop on the red line. We got there relatively early on a Sunday morning, but clearly not early enough as we waited in about a 45 minute line to get in. But oh, was it totally worth it.

bagelsaurus_bagel
Like at Twin Donut, we split the two things we got. This was a cinnamon raisin bagel with cream cheese. SO. GOOD.

bagelsaurus_bagel_sandwich
This was the classic jumbo sandwich with added bacon and avocado (so egg, cheddar, mustard butter, bacon, and avocado) on a plain bagel. It was good, but I think I preferred the bagel and cream cheese. Hell, this place had good enough bagels to go back and just snarf one plain, with nothing on it. They were that good.

Day Five we finally ate the buffet at our hotel (Holiday Inn Brookline) and Day Six was back to T. Anthony’s, this time for their French toast, which was as good as I remember it being back in college.